Hot Careers: The 2019 Job Search How-To

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Getting your first job is almost as unforgettable as getting married (for the 1st time). You’d reach out to as many postings as possible, hoping for the best fit, and one that accepts you (for who you are). Sometimes, you’d mistaken a “good” one for the “best” one, and only find out later that it’s not really the “right” one.

Technology has changed and hence society has evolved. Job search is not as simple as it was a decade ago, but in some ways, it has returned to the core principals of network, network and more network. Here are some tips for success in 2019.

GOOD TIMING

With the help of social media, our contacts have increased tremendously. You can easily get in touch with people in the same field, or potential employers having already know a lot about them being “friends” on LinkedIn or Facebook for a while. However, reach out to your contact only when you are sure of what you want to pursue. Don’t over-exhaust your contacts by asking for introductions you are not sure you’ll end up following through.

DEVELOP YOUR TRADEMARK SKILLS

Take inventory of what you are good at doing and highlight your top three skills. Put efforts into enhancing those skills through volunteered works, social activities, previous career history, social media profiles… When drafting your cover letter or presenting yourself at an interview, be sure to highlight those top skills within the first few minutes. Think of yourself as an essential “product” and then develop unique characteristics surrounding the promotion of that product.

MULTI CHANNEL APPROACH

Modern times calls for a multi-channel approach so don’t limit yourself to just online job search. Try recruitment centres, socialize with people from your extracurricular classes, visit our old high school staff or your local legislator office. Put yourself often in environments that are fitting to your fields and skills.

BE GRATEFUL

You might not get hired but you can leave an outstanding impression. Try to come across as confident but humble, serious yet open to suggestions and inputs, and most importantly: be nice. Send a thank you note after every interview. Be nice to everyone you happen to stumble upon. Your skills matter but your attitude decides your luck. Even if you don’t get the job you applied for, your decency will go a long way in getting you that next chance.